2nd Degree Sunburn

Second-degree burns affect deeper layers of the skin and cause blisters and white, wet, and shiny skin. Third-degree burns involve damage to all layers of the skin, while fourth-degree burns may.

  1. Second degree sunburns are painful, and taking an over-the-counter pain reliever can decrease the pain you feel until it heals. Gibson, M.D., recommends taking anti-inflammatory medications until your painful symptoms subside.
  2. Oct 01, 2020 Sunburn of second degree 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Billable/Specific Code L55.1 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2021 edition of ICD-10-CM L55.1 became effective on October 1, 2020.
  3. Second-degree burns involve the outer layer of the skin and part of the inner layer of skin. They may be caused by very hot water, open flames, hot objects, sun, chemicals, or electricity. They are treated by applying cold at first. Creams or lotions and non-stick dressings are used.
2ndDegree

2nd Degree Sunburn

What are the classifications of burns?

2nd Degree Sunburn

Burns are classified as first-, second-, third-degree, or fourth-degree depending on how deeply and severely they penetrate the skin's surface.

2nd Degree Sunburn Healing Time

  • First-degree (superficial) burns. First-degree burns affect only the outer layer of skin, the epidermis. The burn site is red, painful, dry, and with no blisters. Mild sunburn is an example. Long-term tissue damage is rare and often consists of an increase or decrease in the skin color.

  • Second-degree (partial thickness) burns. Second-degree burns involve the epidermis and part of the lower layer of skin, the dermis. The burn site looks red, blistered, and may be swollen and painful.

  • Third-degree (full thickness) burns. Third-degree burns destroy the epidermis and dermis. They may go into the innermost layer of skin, the subcutaneous tissue. The burn site may look white or blackened and charred.

  • Fourth-degree burns. Fourth-degree burns go through both layers of the skin and underlying tissue as well as deeper tissue, possibly involving muscle and bone. There is no feeling in the area since the nerve endings are destroyed.